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ЗдоровьеНа кого подписаться: Инстаграм Sick Sad Girlz
о стойких женщинах

На кого подписаться: Инстаграм Sick Sad Girlz 
о стойких женщинах — Здоровье на Wonderzine

Поддерживающее инстаграм-сообщество для людей с хроническими заболеваниями

ПРОДОЛЖАЕМ РАССКАЗЫВАТЬ о достойных аккаунтах в соцсетях, через которые можно рассматривать целый мир.

Роза Меркуриадис практически всю жизнь борется с волчанкой, фибромиалгией и хронической усталостью — чтобы поддержать девушек с похожими заболеваниями, она основала инстаграм-сообщество Sick Sad Girlz, в котором подписчики открыто делятся своими историями о разного рода физических заболеваниях и психических расстройствах. Сейчас на странице почти сто пятьдесят постов, в том числе истории Лены Данэм о жизни с обсессивно-компульсивным расстройством, эндометриозом, синдромом Элерса — Данлоса, фибромиалгией и хронической болезнью Лайма.

По словам Меркуриадис, Sick Sad Girlz — это своего рода безопасное пространство, которое способно помочь многим девушкам с хроническими заболеваниями «избавиться от страданий и почувствовать себя менее одинокими». В планах женщины на ближайшее будущее — запустить подкаст, сделать мерч и устраивать офлайн-встречи.

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I have never been well. I don’t know what people mean when they say “I’m fine.” I am acutely aware we all suffer and I’m not some special pixie with pelvic issues, but I also know pain is isolating. And that isolation can be awful but it’s also what makes me a writer and an artist and an empath. It’s what makes me love to dance and paint and kiss and it leads to big triumphs and big mistakes and living big. I try and create awareness wherever I can for the issues I live with- OCD, endometriosis, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic Lyme. But I also worry it’s too much of a mouthful, that nobody will believe so many diagnoses because ya can’t get struck by lightning twice. It’s all interconnected, I explain. I’m the scientist, the historian, the comedian- just trying to figure out how. Love, @lenadunham

Публикация от Sick Sad Girlz Club (@sicksadgirlz)

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Hi I’m Genie - I’ve had asthma, well forever but I was diagnosed when I was 3. If I got a cold or worse the flu when I was a kid more often than not I would end up in the hospital. I’ve been on more steroids than the Russian Olympic Team. As a result my breathing has always been an intense source of anxiety for me, always checking to see if I have my inhaler (and the 4 other medications I take regularly) and melting down if I can’t find it. After a traumatic experience at 17 I started getting panic attacks and it only got worse. Any slight twinge in my chest and I panic going into full fight or flight mode - if my inhaler is not immediately available to me my panic grows. This has resulted in inhalers in every coat pocket, every handbag, underneath every item of furniture and a deep seeded fear of the apocalypse because what if I can’t get an inhaler (not kidding). A lot of people don’t know I have asthma or anxiety but they’re both in the forefront of my thoughts on a daily basis. I’ve been denied health insurance because of my asthma and paid through the nose for travel coverage. My entire pregnancy with my daughter I feared she would have it too (it’s genetic my father, grandmother and brother all have it). Now that’s she’s almost two every cough brings me to a panic and I hope she’s like her father who’s healthy as a horse. My immune system is shot to shit - apparently steroids don’t help and I get sick if I’m within a mile radius of someone with a cold. When I get sick it goes straight to my chest which of course triggers my asthma and it’s a vicious cycle. I had 5 surgeries before I turned 30 - a consequence of a terrible immune system. It’s chronic it’s not the worst thing that’s ever happened to someone it is what it is but it sucks and it’s forever and unfortunately I can give it to my kids. More than anything I’m just happy I’m here and it’s not worse than it is. Love, @g_lea_fitz.denise

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Who knew that my very legitimate diagnosis as “quirky” from a young age would grow into being severe bipolar disorder! Life is full of glamorous mysteries. The curse of my bipolar is that I tried hiding it for so long (I shoved my depressive episodes as far into the dark as I possibly could - I only let my depressive freak flag fly once I was out of the sight of...well, everyone) and shoved my manic episodes to the surface because look at how amazing and functional I am omg! You like my vintage t shirt? Thank u I paid way too much money for it after watching it on eBay for 7 hours straight over night with the concentration of a literal practicing monk! I mean, ya it’s vintage idk where I got it. Eventually, the jig was up. After a period of time that I call “rock bottom” (ever heard of it?) I finally got the proper medication and care for my quirk* *bipolar disorder But now I do still have to deal with the very intense manic and depressive episodes. Although my friends, family, and anyone who will listen knows about my diagnosis, I often struggle against the fact that I do stay home a lot due to being overwhelmed by plans, people, places, and things. Although I can come off as fun and energetic during manic episodes, I close off when I’m depressed (duh). But I often feel like a broken record, boring, and burdensome when I have to continually remind my loved ones of my bipolar disorder. No, I can’t go out tonight I’m tired. I’m tired because I’m depressed. Or I’m tired because I spent the last two nights collaging(?) and need sleep. Whatever it is, I feel like it even sounds made up. I hope it sounds as convincing as it feels to me. Love, @hannah_h_klein

Публикация от Sick Sad Girlz Club (@sicksadgirlz)

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I don’t remember feeling “okay”, not since I was tiny. I haven’t felt okay since I was eleven years old, and I’ll be thirty this year. My name is Cara, and I have a chronic mental illness called persistent depressive disorder (formerly known as dysthymia). For close to twenty years, I’ve had what I would describe as a constant cloud over my head. Major episodes of depression have been and gone, and they will no doubt return. The comorbid nature of my illness has allowed other conditions to creep in over the years too; OCD, anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder have all reared their ugly heads. I eventually managed to overcome all of these “add ons”, but the cloud still remains. It has taken a lot from me; my concentration/attention span, my memory, my ability to make decisions for myself, friendships, my motivation, my education, work. I feel constantly exhausted from having to live like this. However, I am resilient, and I never stop trying to enjoy my life as best I can, even if there is a constant undertone of gloom. Any achievement, no matter how small, is a victory to me. I felt I should share my condition with my fellow #SSGz as chronic mental illness isn’t exactly at the forefront of public consciousness when it comes to mental health awareness. I’m hopeful that one day doctors and researchers will look further into the condition I have. Currently, it seems to be overlooked as it isn’t deemed as “serious”, but is it really acceptable for PDD to be weighing me down for the rest of my life? No, it isn’t. I would like to live a cloud-free life someday. It’s taken me a long time to no longer feel inadequate and like a worthy human being, and I now know I am deserving of being able to feel happiness without darkness overshadowing it. So um, hey. I exist, and plenty of others like me exist, I’m sure. And despite having to constantly struggle with this cloud of mine, I know that deep down I am a badass for continuing to endure it. I hope you know that all of you are badasses too. Oh, and the floof I’m hugging is my dog, Elke. She is my sunshine and keeps me going, even on the darkest of days. Love, @glacialglow

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I came to America when I was 5 years old. I grew up undocumented, and my parents still are. I don’t know what it’s like to not be in intense pain, to not want to die, but to know I can’t die because I have people to take care of. I’ve been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, treatment resistant depression, anxiety, OCD, chronic migraines. I don’t know how much of all of this is chemical, genetic, and how much are the traumas of migration, my own, and my parents, how much are the traumas of racism. I’m an immigration writer and I try to write about pain, physical and emotional and bone-deep. I want to write about immigrants as people who love and hurt, out in the open, not in the shadows, if only people would care to see. Love, @kcornv

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I suffer from so many mental and health issues it’s hard to remember them all. I’ve been suffering from panic attacks since I can remember. As a child I thought it was normal because it was my own normal. Severe anxiety has been a part of my life for so long I don’t remember how it feels to be “healthy”. Women in my family are generally unwell, deeply depressed or filled with anxiety. Depression first hit me when I was seventeen or eighteen. I wish I could say I was carefree and happy before that. I don’t think I ever was. The first time I went to a psychiatrist was when I was nineteen because I didn’t have the will to live. I’ve been on medication since. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. I’m in between doctors right now. I am diagnosed with clinical depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder. Psychically I suffer from constant bladder infections and ibs. I am constantly battling my eating disorder. I first started starving myself when I was thirteen and lost 25 pounds in two months. Life is hell sometimes. Especially when I’m scared of nothing and everything and can’t get out of bed and it all seems pointless. I grasp the good moments. Dancing with my friends and kissing strangers. Falling in love. Getting my heart broken. Laughing with my mom. I’m not giving up, not yet. Life is beautiful if you pay attention. Love, @przemilamilena

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My name is Mary and two of my sisters and myself have a rare genetic disorder, Escobar syndrome. While I was always candid about my physical limitations, it wasn’t until recently that I embraced the label of disability. And once I began to identify as physically disabled, a whole new community opened up for me, a community full of brilliant activists and advocates who I continue to learn from every day. So I focused my education, and then my career, on Disability Studies. I’m specifically passionate about addressing the serious lack of representation of disabled people in media and in the public. Not wanting to wait for that representation in my own life, my sister (@hannah.layden) and I created our company @lovebilinyc, an apparel company that promotes disability awareness and empowerment. Our message is simple—love your ability, no matter what that ability may be. I believe this because I love mine. Love, @maylay27

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I’m Eve, I’m 23 and I’ve got MAV (migraine associated vertigo) - that sounds like the worst Take Me Out introduction ever. And how ironic that nobody can take me out, because I’m too sad and too sick to go anywhere (@cantgoout_imsick I love your work)! My symptoms include vertigo (room spinning, floor rocking, walls closing in), numb legs, trouble speaking, brain fog, visual impairment and disassociation which has then made me anxious and depressed. I can’t work and I often struggle to walk. I miss going to the pub, cycling down hills and dancing with my friends. I’ve been to 10 doctors (mostly men) and tried 9 different medications which have all made me sad, sick, and then heartbroken every time they don’t work. In the Victorian times the illness was known as “Floating Woman’s Disease” (something to do with “vapours” and “hysteria”) and would mean institutionalisation. As with so many illnesses that affect mainly women, I don’t feel like much had changed since then, due to a lack of research and an inability to take women seriously. Today, male doctors are less likely to prescribe appropriate medication for women than men, they’re more likely to presume women’s illnesses are ‘just psychological’, and medication still isn’t being tested on women. I’ve been made to feel totally responsible for my own pain, which then makes me unbearably sad when I don’t get better. And I’m lucky - I’m white, I’m middle class, I have the NHS. So many people don’t have these privileges. We’re not being taken seriously by medical professionals, partly because pain is seen as our destiny as women (“women are born with pain built in. It’s our physical destiny” as Phoebe Waller Bridge just reminded us a few weeks ago 🤤🤤🤤). But imagine how successful, how powerful, how HAPPY we’d be if we didn’t have period pains, fibromyalgia, PMDD, MS, endometriosis, MAV...the list goes on and on. It’s not fair that the thing that joins us together is suffering, and yet we still feel so isolated. We need to demand more for ourselves and other women. But right now, I’m too sad and sick to get out of bed. Love @evedelaney_________

Публикация от Sick Sad Girlz Club (@sicksadgirlz)

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