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Интригующий инстаграм Gucci Beauty

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Интригующий инстаграм Gucci Beauty — Красота на Wonderzine

Продолжаем рассказывать достойных аккаунтах в соцсетях, через которые можно рассматривать целый мир.

Инстаграм @guccibeauty появился несколько дней назад — сейчас издания расценивают это как прозрачный намёк на возрождение косметической линии бренда в эпоху Алессандро Микеле. Запуски новых ароматов креативному директору марки более чем удались, так что такая версия событий звучит правдоподобно.

Подписаться на Gucci Beauty стоит буквально из любви к искусству. На этой бьюти-странице вы не найдёте банок, макияжей и модельных лиц, там выкладывают портреты художников разных эпох — с соблюдением принципа разнообразия. Ждём с нетерпением следующего шага Алессандро Микеле, а пока можно вдохновляться историей живописи вместе с одной из самых интересных марок на сегодня.

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Title: Portrait of a Young Woman, 1485 Author: Sandro Botticelli (Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi) Museum: Staedelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt-am-Main ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Simonetta Vespucci was nicknamed “la bella Simonetta.” She was known as the most beautiful woman of her age upon her entrance into the Florentine court around 1470. She came from Genoa; “like Venus, she was born among the waves,” one poet wrote. But the great beauty died when she was 22. The Florentine painter Sandro Botticelli, a star of the early Renaissance, may have used Simonetta as inspiration for some of his famous paintings, including this idealized 1485 portrait in the collection of Stadelsches Kunstinstitut. Simonetta’s flowing red hair is her signature, leading to the possibility that she is also the model for Botticelli’s “Primavera,” among others. #GucciBeauty — @kchayka Stadelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany / Bridgeman Images

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Title: Portraits of two women, 1950 Author: Lois Mailou Jones Private Collection ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Nearly every moment of #LoisMailouJones’s life was captured and shared through her paintings. Her style traversed the aesthetic landscape, first mimicking the work of the post-Impressionists and then drawing from the rich colors and symbols of Africa and Haiti, where she often traveled. In her portraits, Jones was known for her ability to capture the rich complexities of black skin tones, rendering her subjects (often her friends or students from Howard University, where she taught) as near three-dimensional figures. Styled in feminine blouses with red lips and curled hair, Jones manages to capture each woman’s beauty in this 1950 painting’s tight headshots. Jones suggests a familiarity and bond between the two only found through family or friendship. #GucciBeauty — @britticisms Lois Mailou Jones Pierre-Noel Trust

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Title: Portrait of Maria de’ Medici Author: Agnolo Bronzino Museum: Uffizi Gallery, Florence ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Maria de’ Medici, depicted in this 16th-century Mannerist portrait, was a member of Italy’s famous Medici family, a powerful banking and political dynasty who also became patrons of the arts. Maria, a daughter of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, was a lovely, highly educated young woman, who tragically died at the age of seventeen. In this portrait, painted when she was eleven and in the @uffizigalleries, her delicate youth and beauty seem to radiate out of the canvas, forever preserving this beloved young woman in time. #GucciBeauty #Uffizi— @lrsphm Courtesy of MIBAC/Gallerie degli Uffizi

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Title: Self Portrait, c.1902 Author: Maxwell Ashby Armfield Private Collection ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The British artist Maxwell Ashby Armfield didn’t enjoy figure drawing during his education at the Birmingham School of Art. Instead, he leapt into the Arts & crafts Movement, which saw artists in the United Kingdom embracing decorative aesthetics, exaggerated forms, and inspiration from other cultures, including China, Japan, and the ancient Celts. In this tempera painting from 1902, from a private collection, Armfield depicts himself as a bohemian gentleman, his wavy hair echoing the fabric of his cravat. He collaborated closely with his wife, Constance Smedley. #GucciBeauty — @kchayka ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀⠀ © The Estate of Maxwell Armfield / Photo © Fine Art Society / Bridgeman Images

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Title: Woman from Constantinople, standing, c.1876 Author: Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904) Private Collection ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The French painter Jean-Léon Gérôme is the quintessential Orientalist painter, a European artist interested in a fantastical, stylized depiction of other cultures. After visiting Egypt in 1856 he became fascinated with the Middle East in particular and brought back local artifacts and costumes, which he used as props in his Paris studio. His work was extremely popular and much of it is now held in private collections, including this moody portrait. Gérôme wrapped his model in a translucent veil in a nod to her perceived exotic origins, drawing our attention to her languid gaze and ambiguous smile. Yet the image is theatrical, almost a fiction. #GucciBeauty — @tatianaberg Photo © Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images

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Title: Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, 1778 Author: David Martin Museum: Scone Palace, Scotland ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ One of the subjects of this dual portrait from 1778 is Dido Elizabeth Belle, who was born into slavery — her mother was African and her father a Scottish admiral. Only when her mother died did her father come to claim her. Dido became an aristocrat — free and educated — raised among gentry like the other young woman pictured, Lady Elizabeth Murray. It was only in the 1990s that Dido’s identity in this work by an unknown artist (perhaps by David Martin) was determined. The canvas now occupies a place of pride in the Scone Palace. #GucciBeauty — @kchayka Image of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, daughters of Sir John Lindsay and David 2nd Earl of Mansfield by David Martin (1737 – 1797) from the Earl of Mansfield's collection at Scone Palace, Scotland. Copyright © 2018 remains at all times with the Earl of Mansfield, Scone Palace, Scotland.

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Title: Woman Shaving her Nape, 1897 Author: Toyohara (Yōshū) Chikanobu, Akiyama Buemon Museum: LACMA, Los Angeles ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The 19th-century Japanese artist Yoshu Chikanobu made multiple series of traditional woodblock prints focusing on beautiful women, the genre of bijinga, with names like “True Beauties”. The portraits represent the male gaze, but this image of a woman rearranging her hair in a casual, self-aware pose demonstrates an awareness of the labor involved in maintaining beauty, particularly in a culture where women are often expected to be passive. The outlines and soft colors of such woodblock prints also influenced the Impressionists, like the American Mary Cassatt. This image is in the collection of @LACMA, one of the #GucciPlaces. #GucciBeauty — @kchayka Image courtesy of LACMA

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Title: Portrait of a young woman in red, A.D. 90–120 Museum: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This striking portrait from the @metmuseum is a mummy portrait from Roman Egypt, meaning that it would have been painted on a panel that was attached to the wrapped corpse of its subject, the young woman in red. Despite being a funerary image, the woman it depicts is startlingly lifelike, even timeless: her large, dark eyes, emphasized by long lashes, seem to gaze directly at the viewer, framed by the loose curls of hair piled atop her head. The luminosity of her skin against the faded background and the clear features of her face make this portrait feel contemporary, though she lived almost two thousand years ago. #GucciBeauty #TheMet — @lrsphm Rogers Fund, 1909

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Title: Vanitas, a young woman seated at her dressing table, 1632 Author: Paulus Moreelse Private Collection ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In his native city of Utrecht, Paulus Moreelse was a sought-after portraitist. He was especially appreciated for his rich use of color, often imbuing his figures with a lively, pink-cheeked vigor. One of his favorite genres was playfully sensual portraiture of young women with tousled blonde hair and overflowing décolletage. This privately held painting is a particularly memorable example, wherein he places the woman at her dressing table. Her gold jewelry is splayed out in pride on the tablecloth, an example of vanitas, a genre of painting meant to symbolize both the pleasure and ultimately futility of earthly delights. #GucciBeauty — @tatianaberg Johnny Van Haeften Ltd., London / Bridgeman Images

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Title: Portrait of a Court Lady, Seated Half Length in an Embroidered Robe, Holding a Flower, mid 19th century Author: Chinese School Private Collection ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Shanghai School of painting introduced a fresh alternative to the then-dominating Literati style. Western-influenced brightly colored portraiture was among the newly adopted styles, a direct reaction to the demands of Shanghai’s mercantile elite who craved something distinct from the traditional aesthetics of the Chinese scholarly and gentry classes. This 19th-century portrait captures the era’s distinct stylistic elements, which included a brightly-colored palette (as depicted in the blues, greens, and reds of the subject’s clothing and large, dangly earrings) and exaggerated physical form. #GucciBeauty — @britticisms Photo © Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images

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Title: Woman At Toilette / Keshō no onna, 1918 Author: Hashiguchi Goyō Museum: LACMA, Los Angeles ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Ukiyo-e, a Japanese movement, was characterized by its depictions of beautiful women and landscapes that reflected the newly hedonistic “floating world” created by Tokyo’s economic growth in the Edo period. In this 1918 portrait, Hashiguchi Goyō, a woodblock artist, uses delicate lines to render a beautiful woman applying powder to her skin. Her fully exposed shoulder is alluring in contrast to her demure expression, and she seems to be caught in a personal, domestic moment — underscoring the tension and seduction in the delicate balance between public beauty and private adornment. The image is in the collection of @LACMA, one of the #GucciPlaces. #GucciBeauty — @lrsphm Image courtesy of LACMA

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обложка: LACMA

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